DIVERSITY SPOTLIGHT THURSDAY (#8)

Diversity Spotlight Thursday is a weekly meme hosted by Bookshelves and Paperbacks. Each week, you feature a diverse book you have read and enjoyed, a diverse book on your TBR and a diverse book that has not yet been released.

In preparation for the #RamadanReadathon I am co-hosting next month, this week I will be talking about books written by Muslim authors! I already featured some #ownvoices books with Muslim protagonists for one of my previous posts so I guess this is a continuation of that theme.

A  B O O K  I  H A V E  R E A D

malalaMALALA: THE GIRL WHO STOOD UP FOR EDUCATION AND CHANGED THE WORLD BY MALALA YOUSAFZAI AND PATRICIA MCCORMICK

Goodreads | Amazon UK | Book Depository


Malala Yousafzai was only ten years old when the Taliban took control of her region. They said music was a crime. They said women weren’t allowed to go to the market. They said girls couldn’t go to school.

Raised in a once-peaceful area of Pakistan transformed by terrorism, Malala was taught to stand up for what she believes. So she fought for her right to be educated. And on October 9, 2012, she nearly lost her life for the cause: She was shot point-blank while riding the bus on her way home from school.

No one expected her to survive.

Now she is an international symbol of peaceful protest and the youngest- ever Nobel Peace Prize nominee. Malala’s powerful story will open your eyes to another world and will make you believe in hope, truth, miracles, and the possibility that one person- one young person- can inspire change in her community and beyond.

Apparently, this is the young readers edition of Malala’s memoir, I Am Malala. I’m not sure what the differences are but I’m guessing the underlying message is the same. I read this almost three years ago when I didn’t know much about Malala’s story, so this is a really insightful read if you’re in the same boat.

A  B O O K  O N  M Y  T B R

written in the starsWRITTEN IN THE STARS BY AISHA SAEED

Goodreads | Amazon UK | Book Depository


Naila’s conservative immigrant parents have always said the same thing: She may choose what to study, how to wear her hair, and what to be when she grows up—but they will choose her husband. Following their cultural tradition, they will plan an arranged marriage for her. And until then, dating—even friendship with a boy—is forbidden. When Naila breaks their rule by falling in love with Saif, her parents are livid. Convinced she has forgotten who she truly is, they travel to Pakistan to visit relatives and explore their roots. But Naila’s vacation turns into a nightmare when she learns that plans have changed—her parents have found her a husband and they want her to marry him, now! Despite her greatest efforts, Naila is aghast to find herself cut off from everything and everyone she once knew. Her only hope of escape is Saif . . . if he can find her before it’s too late.

This has been on my TBR for so long and I think I might finally get around to reading it for the readathon. Even though it’s something I’ve never read about in a book before, I’m very familiar with the narrative so I can’t wait to see how the author deals with this controversial subject matter.

A  B O O K  R E L E A S I N G  S O O N

city of brassTHE CITY OF BRASS BY S. A. CHAKRABORTY

Goodreads | Amazon UK


Nahri has never believed in magic. Certainly, she has power; on the streets of 18th century Cairo, she’s a con woman of unsurpassed talent. But she knows better than anyone that the trade she uses to get by—palm readings, zars, healings—are all tricks, sleights of hand, learned skills; a means to the delightful end of swindling Ottoman nobles.

But when Nahri accidentally summons an equally sly, darkly mysterious djinn warrior to her side during one of her cons, she’s forced to accept that the magical world she thought only existed in childhood stories is real. For the warrior tells her a new tale: across hot, windswept sands teeming with creatures of fire, and rivers where the mythical marid sleep; past ruins of once-magnificent human metropolises, and mountains where the circling hawks are not what they seem, lies Daevabad, the legendary city of brass – a city to which Nahri is irrevocably bound.

In that city, behind gilded brass walls laced with enchantments, behind the six gates of the six djinn tribes, old resentments are simmering. And when Nahri decides to enter this world, she learns that true power is fierce and brutal. That magic cannot shield her from the dangerous web of court politics. That even the cleverest of schemes can have deadly consequences.

After all, there is a reason they say be careful what you wish for . . .  

This is pretty far away so technically it’s not ‘releasing soon’ but the cover and the setting and monsters and magic? I literally couldn’t ask for more. I can already tell that Nahri will become one of my favourite protagonists. I believe this is also the first book in a series. I’m probably going to pester the publisher for an ARC because I want it that much.

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